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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 8:20 am
by Dee
llanfairfach wrote:In the home counties it's probably parsta :faint: .
Londoners would also say parsta, but without the "posh" inflection.
Variety is the spice of life though - incidentally, I hate pasta :oops: .

I have a friend from Johannesburg. You should hear the way SHE says pasta :harhar:

Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 9:02 am
by my_cat_silky
Sionned wrote:I do have a very useful book for translating between British and American English.


I would love to read this book, Sionned! Regional variations in speech are an endless source of fascination for me! :lol:
llanfairfach wrote: Variety is the spice of life though.


I couldn't agree more, llanfairfach! Each to his own, eh? :D

Dee wrote:I have a friend from Johannesburg. You should hear the way SHE says pasta :harhar:


I would love to hear how she says it, Dee - I love the South African accent! It's really curious, but so many people ask me if I'm South African - I mean, my Australian accent isn't that strong now, I believe, so where on earth are they getting the South African accent from?? :lol:

Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 9:46 am
by Maynard
I like the south african accent too. We have friends from there who now live in Lynn. I am from the East midlands and cannot be understood if I speak in my natural accent to any one south of Watford Gap lol. When I was 16 i had a new manager at work and he was from Co Durham ( say 150 miles away) I could not understand a word he said for 2 weeks until i got used to him. I remember asking the girls in the shop to translate what he said. I experienced the same thing when I was in Dundee for two years.. no chance. My sons went to school there and very broad scottish accents. We moved to east anglia a couple of years later, they were teased at school .. I wished I had recorded their voices, they would have been so surprised as now they speak broad Norfolk. My last trip to Wales took me to Bala for one day / night / morning. I was in a local pub and although they understood my welsh with no problem, I really struggled to understand them. I'm going back in a couple of weeks and I'm hoping to go to the same pub and stick it out lol

Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:20 pm
by my_cat_silky
Maynard wrote:I like the south african accent too. We have friends from there who now live in Lynn. I am from the East midlands and cannot be understood if I speak in my natural accent to any one south of Watford Gap lol. When I was 16 i had a new manager at work and he was from Co Durham ( say 150 miles away) I could not understand a word he said for 2 weeks until i got used to him. I remember asking the girls in the shop to translate what he said. I experienced the same thing when I was in Dundee for two years.. no chance. My sons went to school there and very broad scottish accents. We moved to east anglia a couple of years later, they were teased at school .. I wished I had recorded their voices, they would have been so surprised as now they speak broad Norfolk. My last trip to Wales took me to Bala for one day / night / morning. I was in a local pub and although they understood my welsh with no problem, I really struggled to understand them. I'm going back in a couple of weeks and I'm hoping to go to the same pub and stick it out lol


What fascinating tales, John! It is a continual source of wonder to me that people living in the same country can find it difficult to understand people from different counties, but it is truly the case! I suppose Australia will in time develop more regional variations in speech, but never to the same degree as here! :D

I hope you have a wonderful time when you return to Wales and good luck with the locals in the Bala pub! :smile:

Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:41 pm
by Dee
my_cat_silky wrote:I would love to hear how she says it, Dee - I love the South African accent! It's really curious, but so many people ask me if I'm South African - I mean, my Australian accent isn't that strong now, I believe, so where on earth are they getting the South African accent from?? :lol:

I love the South African accent too. When I was living in Australia I often got asked if I was from South Africa. That was the most common guess people had at my accent, which they couldn't pick as Kiwi for some reason. Mind you when I go back to New Zealand people ask me where I'm from, so I guess I don't sound like them any more. And my brother who still lives in New Zealand asks me "Where did you get that South African accent from?" so I suppose it's all relative. Perhaps next time I visit him he'll think I sound Welsh :lol:

Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 12:24 pm
by Elizabeth Jane
I would love to hear how she says it, Dee - I love the South African accent! It's really curious, but so many people ask me if I'm South African - I mean, my Australian accent isn't that strong now, I believe, so where on earth are they getting the South African accent from??


That would be the Kiwi bit, Dee. I reckon some of the vowel sounds are clipped similar to South African.

When we lived in Fiji my son had a Kiwi teacher with a very broad accent for the first few years of his schooling. When we attended his first parent teacher interview after coming back to Australia, the teacher said, his reading comprehension was great and his written work. But he couldn't sound words out. There is something wrong with is vowel sounds. We laughingly refrained from informing her that just across the ditch his vowel sounds would be considered perfect.