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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Aran » Thu May 03, 2012 10:05 am

Elizabeth Jane wrote:I have often thought that language is much the same. To speak a language. To get inside the mind of a people and to be able to communicate on that level is like taking in a mother's milk. It changes you, irreversibly, like blood. It makes you belong.


Wow.

I think that's one of the most powerful things I've read about language learning.

:star:
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Elizabeth Jane » Thu May 03, 2012 10:15 am

Aran wrote:
Elizabeth Jane wrote:I have often thought that language is much the same. To speak a language. To get inside the mind of a people and to be able to communicate on that level is like taking in a mother's milk. It changes you, irreversibly, like blood. It makes you belong.


Wow.

I think that's one of the most powerful things I've read about language learning.

:star:


Thanks. But you know - the gift of came from you. :-)
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Lostforwords » Thu May 03, 2012 10:36 am

my_cat_silky wrote: "llyncu mul"

As GBS or Oscar Wilde probably didn't say: North and South Wales are two nations divided by a common language.
*Rhedeg bant a pwdu* :dafad:
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Iestyn » Thu May 03, 2012 12:35 pm

Lostforwords wrote:As GBS or Oscar Wilde probably didn't say: North and South Wales are two nations divided by a common language.
*Rhedeg bant a pwdu* :dafad:


Actually - interesting point. I wonder whether the dialect differences between northern and southern Welsh are as large as those between English English and American or Australian English? That would be a good point of reference for people who are concerned about not being understood.
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Journeymouse » Thu May 03, 2012 5:49 pm

Iestyn wrote:
Lostforwords wrote:As GBS or Oscar Wilde probably didn't say: North and South Wales are two nations divided by a common language.
*Rhedeg bant a pwdu* :dafad:


Actually - interesting point. I wonder whether the dialect differences between northern and southern Welsh are as large as those between English English and American or Australian English? That would be a good point of reference for people who are concerned about not being understood.


As someone who inexpertly deals with accents and dialects from all over the UK and had to cope with various Breton, Burgundian and Parisian accents while attempting to learn French, I'd say probably. People never seem to understand how far even local dialects (i.e. one village to the next) can vary. The "advantage" that <insert nation here> English has is that we tend to deal in a standardised form. Plus we're exposed to whatever is considered acceptable on tv and radio, which in the UK tends to be standard vocabulary with regional accents and plenty of American and Australian (equally standardised) material. We have a slightly better chance of understanding them than they do of understanding us if they don't have similar exposure to vocabulary,

(Edited to allow for American dialect)
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Cer » Fri May 04, 2012 3:28 am

Still, talking to Brits online, I've found that there are many colloquial differences (What the heck is _______?) and, some of them can be funny. These aren't necessarily the things you'd hear on TV, or, if you do, you don't notice that there's a difference, since the word is similar or the same, just a slightly different meaning. Americans review, Brits revise, for instance. Heck, aside from a particular word that just keeps popping into mind, all I can think of, off-hand, are academic words - sit an exam, take an exam; read a subject, study, or 'take,' a subject.

In fact, the term 'read,' for a course of study, really threw me when I first saw it. Okay, so you're reading about that - what are you actually taking?
:dafad: Please feel free to correct me. Thanks! :dafad:

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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Gruntius » Fri May 04, 2012 9:22 am

Iestyn wrote:
Lostforwords wrote:As GBS or Oscar Wilde probably didn't say: North and South Wales are two nations divided by a common language.
*Rhedeg bant a pwdu* :dafad:


Actually - interesting point. I wonder whether the dialect differences between northern and southern Welsh are as large as those between English English and American or Australian English? That would be a good point of reference for people who are concerned about not being understood.

Around the UK the English can throw me. A guy I used to work with once said "wukin wuth ahs lik wukin wi neel up'n boo-uht!" he was from oop North somewhere. What he actually said was "working with you is like working with a nail in my boot!" he had to repeat a lot of his sentences a few times before anyone could understand him even though he was speaking the same language!
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby my_cat_silky » Fri May 04, 2012 12:51 pm

Cer wrote:In fact, the term 'read,' for a course of study, really threw me when I first saw it. Okay, so you're reading about that - what are you actually taking?


I concur completely, Cer! When I first came to England, I was totally thrown by this expression as well, as it's not used in Australia either!

Iestyn wrote:I wonder whether the dialect differences between northern and southern Welsh are as large as those between English English and American or Australian English? That would be a good point of reference for people who are concerned about not being understood.


This would be a fascinating topic to debate, Iestyn! I, for one, have found it, and still find it, frustrating when my Australian expressions are not understood here in England, to the point where I have had no choice but to drop most of them in order not to stick out like a sore thumb. In fact, my daughters were teased and sometimes bullied at school for using Australianisms and even pronouncing words with an Australian accent (although they were born and bred in England!), usually by dinner ladies who insisted that ""You don't say pahsta, it's pasta!" Who says? It's pahsta where I come from! Words are pronounced differently in different parts of the world, not incorrectly! You'd think that being exposed to different cultures through alternative ways of saying things would elicit interest and fascination, not mockery! :sad:
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Sionned » Fri May 04, 2012 2:50 pm

Huh! I've never heard anything but "pahsta"! And I thought I was pretty familiar with british pronunciations...

I do have a very useful book for translating between British and American English. It may have been mentioned here before (I know it has somewhere, but that could have been on a different forum). It is British English from A to Zed (UK Amazon here). And its a great reference for figuring out some of the more arcane expressions, with some useful appendices and an index that you can use to go from American back to British. It is also a very funny read!
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby llanfairfach » Fri May 04, 2012 9:37 pm

In the home counties it's probably parsta :faint: .
Londoners would also say parsta, but without the "posh" inflection.
Variety is the spice of life though - incidentally, I hate pasta :oops: .
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