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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Dee » Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:54 pm

royaberarth wrote:Wonderful - reading that makes the effort worthwhile - I hope Dee refers to it in her next newsletter - every SSiWer should read it.

You read my mind. :harhar:
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Iestyn » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:14 pm

my_cat_silky wrote:Iestyn - I feel ... proud to be able to make even the teeniest contribution to keeping your beautiful language alive!


<cough! cough!>

You can edit that "y" right off, Alison - it's our language, I'm afraid. When you took possession of your end of the language, you took on all the responsibilities as well - didn't you read the user agreement? :shock:
The SSiW mantra: "Don't worry. If you say something slightly different to me, people will just think you are from a different area / village / street / family to them, or more likely not notice at all!"

"Do not fear going forward slowly; fear only to stand still." Chinese Proverb
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby dysgwr dan :) » Thu Apr 26, 2012 10:09 pm

(mewn acen gog! ) Llongyfarchiadau! ... Fi'n medru cofio siarad efo chdi o'r blaaaaen! A rwan 'dach chi'n siarad yn hollol naturiol! :D Da iawn i chdi! :D

O ran llyncu mul! - I love this idiom! .. I never use pwdi.. I use this instead!
I can remember, three seperate people in south wales gave me a funny look when I used it, and they were pleasantly surprised to discover it's meaning.... they said that they loved it too! .. and would definately remember it! :D
Yr eiddoch yn gywir, Daniel
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Iestyn » Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:30 am

dysgwr dan :) wrote:(mewn acen gog! ) Llongyfarchiadau! ... Fi'n medru cofio siarad efo chdi o'r blaaaaen! A rwan 'dach chi'n siarad yn hollol naturiol! :D Da iawn i chdi! :D

O ran llyncu mul! - I love this idiom! .. I never use pwdi.. I use this instead!
I can remember, three seperate people in south wales gave me a funny look when I used it, and they were pleasantly surprised to discover it's meaning.... they said that they loved it too! .. and would definately remember it! :D


:cry: Oh, Daniel, I had such high hopes for you as well...

:bias:

</trying to protect the southern dialect>
The SSiW mantra: "Don't worry. If you say something slightly different to me, people will just think you are from a different area / village / street / family to them, or more likely not notice at all!"

"Do not fear going forward slowly; fear only to stand still." Chinese Proverb
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby bontddu » Fri Apr 27, 2012 11:51 am

my_cat_silky wrote:One lovely lady, who invited me in for tea, Easter cake and a chat in Cymraeg, explained that she couldn’t speak a word of English until she was 8, and then that one word was “Yes”


I think this might be more common than many English people think. My grandfather couldn't speak English until he was about that age.

my_cat_silky wrote:I was able to use virtually most of the structures and vocab of the three courses and be understood for the most part(even the short past and future forms, which I had some reservations about!).


If you mean the wnes i pattern I know what you mean, but I was surprised to hear this pattern being used in TV shows when we wouldn't use it in English though. In English we tend to use this pattern in the negative a lot, but only in positive terms if we are really stressing it. It would sound odd to say casually "I did go to the shops yesterday" unless we were stressing "did", but "I didn't go to the shops yesterday" is fine. In contrast I have heard characters on Welsh TV use "did" more liberally.
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Iestyn » Fri Apr 27, 2012 2:00 pm

Yes, "wnes i" is very common, without (neccesarily) implying any emphasis at all. That's why we teach it as a far easier way to make the past, and get talking real Welsh with real people than the much more satisfying, but oh-so-complicated-to-learn-to-start-with short form. Most (all?) natural Welsh speakers will take the long form, and use it to varying degrees, without batting an eyelid.
The SSiW mantra: "Don't worry. If you say something slightly different to me, people will just think you are from a different area / village / street / family to them, or more likely not notice at all!"

"Do not fear going forward slowly; fear only to stand still." Chinese Proverb
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby dysgwr dan :) » Fri Apr 27, 2012 3:00 pm

Occasionally, we use magazines for welsh learners in school, and in an interview today.. this guy called Owain used wnes i all the way through the cyfweliad... wnes i this, wnes i that.. wnaeth e what ever...
But my one welsh teacher is completely against it being used like that...
It was almost strange seeing it written down- because I've programmed my brain to use short-form :P

Iestyn! :P ... Rwy'n dwlu ar ddefnyddio amrywiaeth o'r iaith.. a fi'n licio siarad yn wahanol o dro i dro :P
Mae'n ddrwg gen i :P Dylwn i fod yn fwy teyrnol i'r tafodiaith y de! :P
Yr eiddoch yn gywir, Daniel
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby my_cat_silky » Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:09 pm

Iestyn - I will definitely have to re-read that user agreement! :D One of the nicest set of responsibilities ever to come my way! :wink:

Dan - That's a great Gog accent you've got there - you've certainly come a long way, and using "llyncu mul" as well! :wink: I remember chatting with you in my very early days of learning Welsh and finding it such a help to talk to someone as patient and helpful as you! As I said before, you will make an excellent teacher!
:clap:

Bontddu - Nice to meet another fellow Aussie! Although I am starting to feel slightly more Welsh now than Australian...I don't feel at all English, although I've lived here for more than half my life...
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby dysgwr dan :) » Fri Apr 27, 2012 10:07 pm

:) diolch o galon! :D ... I was also pleased to be able to use my welsh with someone new...and hear about your cat yn diflannu and then reappearing, like my rabbits :P
Yr eiddoch yn gywir, Daniel
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Re: "Llyncu Mul" really does work!

Postby Elizabeth Jane » Wed May 02, 2012 11:37 pm

Not feeling particularly that I “belong” anywhere at the moment, I certainly felt that I would have no problem “belonging” in Wales, even though, unlike a lot of people on this forum, I can’t lay claim to any Welsh connections whatsoever, unfortunately!


Ah the horrors of midlife and migration - a sense of not belonging anywhere. I can relate. :-)

You know I think Alison that I have an adopted 'Indian' daughter from Fiji. But I haven't probably said that I was able to partially breastfeed Priya. One day an Indian woman saw me breastfeeding and she gave me a wonderful gift. She told me that children who are fed from your breast are truly yours. They can't marry anyone who was fed from that same breast. It is like sharing the same blood.

I have often thought that language is much the same. To speak a language. To get inside the mind of a people and to be able to communicate on that level is like taking in a mother's milk. It changes you, irreversibly, like blood. It makes you belong.

Llongyfarchiadau on your Welsh and for finding your way home!
Elizabeth Jane
http://hannercymraes.blogspot.com

Please feel free to correct my Welsh
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